How to fix wifi internet speed and connection

In theory, all you need for hassle-free wireless connections in your home or small office is a shiny new router. Yet in practice, your wireless reception is often plagued with interference-related problems.

Interference can result in slower distribution, higher latency than hardware connections, frequent disconnection and reconnection, and sometimes complete inability to access WiFi signals. These problems can be difficult to solve. The solution is not as simple as changing the router unless you are lucky.

Double your goal: 1) you want to avoid paying for a hardware internet connection across your home or office to bypass the slow or unstable wireless connection; 2) You want to avoid buying more expensive wireless routers which can still be a matter of intervention.

Your home or office WiFi network distributes Internet bandwidth using radio signals. It’s the same technology that uses FM radio, smartphones, and television rabbit-ears. Interference, intrusion blocks, and limitations – these are the same types of problems.

Typically, you can identify wireless connection problems in a shortlist of culprits: signal congestion, router location, firmware problems, hardware shortages, and the physical size of your home or office.

But your WiFi problems can also be caused by your neighbors. One of the most common sources of WiFi interference is the WiFi signal and stabilization from nearby power supplies. That’s where your neighbors come into the picture.

Use the following tips to fine-tune your WiFi setup.

  1. Do your internet speed slow?

Before you jump to the conclusion that you are struggling with slow internet speeds, make sure that the advertised speed of your internet plan matches the speed of your internet. To do this, look for a website that lets you measure the speed of the Internet, such as speed.net or fast.com. If the speed results match the speed of the ad provided by your ISP (Internet Service Provider), we want to say that your connection is perfectly fine, and to speed things up, you can always go for an advanced plan that offers faster speeds.

  1. Restart the Wi-Fi router to fix the Wi-Fi problem

Sometimes all you have to do with your Wi-Fi router is a quick restart to fix Wi-Fi connection issues. Just turn off your Wi-Fi router and then turn it on a few seconds later and then check if you’re still getting slow internet speeds. If this does not resolve the Wi-Fi issue, try restarting your computer, phone, or another device. Sometimes slow internet speeds can be just one of the reasons for your devices and not the internet connection.

  1. Slow Wi-Fi can be fixed by adjusting the location of the Wi-Fi router

Are you still experiencing slow internet speeds despite having a high-speed internet connection and a good enough Wi-Fi router? There may be a problem with the location of your router. It is always advisable to place the router in a higher place such as above the wardrobe. Also, you can always place Wi-Fi routers at different spots in your home or workplace to see which area gets the best signal strength before finalizing a place. Remember, Wi-Fi signals are usually able to pass through walls and other objects but in some cases block dense walls or some metal signals. In such situations, it is always advisable to keep your router away from the microwave oven or refrigerator and keep the router at a height and in the best place as we mentioned above.

  1. Adjust the router’s antenna

Holding the antenna straight up on a Wi-Fi router redirects Wi-Fi signals in a single direction. That’s why you should always point the antenna in different directions. For example, many Wi-Fi routers come with two or three antennas. In such a scenario, be sure to point the antenna in vertical and horizontal directions, so that Wi-Fi signals can cover a wider area.

5. Use QoS to fix slow Wi-Fi

One of the best tools that can often be overlooked is QS or Quality of Service, whose job is to split the bandwidth available in your Wi-Fi network between applications. With the best settings, you can watch that wildlife video on YouTube in 4K resolution after you confirm that your latest game has been downloaded on Steam without any starter. QoS lets you decide which service to prioritize over your Wi-Fi network and allocate bandwidth accordingly. Remember, there are different ways to access QS settings for routers, which means that the way to access QOS on a Netgear router will be different from a TP-Link router. To check your router’s QoS settings, type your router’s IP address into a browser and look for the QoS tab to access the settings.

Terrain survey

If you have a wireless problem, first make sure that the hardware connection from your service provider or ISP is not incorrect. Some providers include WiFi service as a feature of Internet cable modems.

You can verify that the hardware internet pipe in your home is working properly by calling your ISP. The technician can remotely test the line, reset your connection, and run speed tests on the modem with a hardware laptop. After finding the problem, the technician can schedule a service call to your property to fix the problem.

If your wireless service comes strictly from a mobile WiFi device, skip the ISP diagnosis and focus on troubleshooting the router. In this case, your goal is to protect your mobile WiFi device from intrusion and interference.

Conduct surveys to remove potential offenders. Test and rule out each of these items:

Location calculation. Is your router stuck in a remote corner of your work or office? Is it low on the floor or blocked by furniture? Move it to a higher place. The clearer the line of sight, the better the connection. Try to keep your router as close to the center of your home as possible.

Unplug your computer from the modem or router. Then turn off the computer and switch all other devices connected to the network, including the media streaming gadget. Reboot your modem and allow it to run fully. Then power the extra router, if you have one, and wait for the lights to stabilize. Lastly, power up your computer and connect it to the wireless signal.

Do an internet search for your ISP speed test website or use a third-party speed test website. If you get bad results for hardware connection, contact your ISP. A bad wired connection breeds a terrible wireless feed. WiFi connections are slow by nature. Download speeds will be faster than upload speeds.

Identify the competition

If you discover that your wireless results are running too slow or change drastically with each test you run, it’s time to expand the survey on your site. Start looking for devices near your home or office that could cause signal interference.

Routers often compete with commonly used devices such as cordless phones, Bluetooth speakers, microwave ovens, and baby monitors. Turn off all such devices temporarily and check the WiFi connection. Turn on each device one by one to find the culprit. Moving the wireless router elsewhere can reduce or minimize interference.

You will notice that the reception is closed in other parts of your home or office. This indicates an infiltration or scope issue or both. In this case, expand your survey to areas where signal strength is low.

Download a WiFi-Analyzer app for your smartphone. Farook’s WiFi Analyzer is a good choice for Android, which is a real-time signal power meter. Other apps are also available. You can get the free app of FarmProk from Google Play Store.

Create a map of the actual WiFi heat in your area using a free tool like the WiFi heatmap available on Google Play, a network analyzer, and a signal meter. NetSpot works for Mac and Windows computers. You can also use apps like Free WiFi Analyzer for Android, which has a real-time signal strength meter.

Another good option is Network Analyzer, an all-in-one iPhone and Android app for network analysis, scanning, and troubleshooting.

Change the channel

Commonly used connected cell devices use a block of tiny-wave 2.4 GHz frequencies, which make it difficult to penetrate hard, mass national walls. The 2.4 GHz frequency known as the “channel” typically uses neighboring WiFi networks and can therefore cause interference.

WiFi standards divide WiFi signals into 2.4 GHz blocks into up to 14 overlapping channels that act as different frequencies. Channels are designed to work together, but when two or more adjacent networks use the same channel, they can interfere with each other, reducing bandwidth.

You can change your network’s WiFi channel to one that isn’t being used nearby.

Open the router’s configuration dashboard from within the PC browser connected to your router. See the router manual for instructions and passwords. Do a web-based search based on the model number for the copy you need.

Then open the Wireless tab of the router. Select an unused channel available. Save the configuration and check the connection results.

This can be helpful if you live or work in an apartment or condo-style building. If a WiFi network near a channel works like yours, make your own changes.

Update the router’s firmware to fix Wi-Fi connection issues

Software updates are very important for your router because they improve its durability, performance, and security. Most routers available nowadays have the ability to update themselves automatically, but if you have an older router, you need to manually install software updates. There are different ways to update the software of different routers. To find out more, type your router’s IP address into any browser on your phone or computer to access Wi-Fi settings for your router.

Using QoS to fix slow Wi-Fi

One of the best tools that can often be overlooked is QS or Quality of Service, whose job is to split the bandwidth available in your Wi-Fi network between applications. With the best settings, you can watch that wildlife video on YouTube in 4K resolution after you confirm that your latest game has been downloaded on Steam without any starter. QoS lets you decide which service to prioritize over your Wi-Fi network and allocate bandwidth accordingly. Remember, there are different ways to access QS settings for routers, which means that the way to access QOS on a Netgear router will be different from a TP-Link router. To check your router’s QoS settings, type your router’s IP address into a browser and look for the QoS tab to access the settings.

Reset your device’s network settings

If resetting your Wi-Fi router doesn’t solve your problem, you should probably consider resetting your device’s network settings. By resetting your device’s network settings, you will basically set them as default. From there, you can reconfigure your Wi-Fi on all your devices and see if doing so solves your problem. The steps are different for each device, and you’ll need to re-enter your Wi-Fi password to access the Internet. If you forgot, you can check out our easy guide to find your Wi-Fi password.

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